Sabermetrics tell us who FPU Baseball’s most valuable batters are

by Kelsey Hausman

The on-base plus slugging (OPS) sabermetric statistic is widely considered one of the best tools to evaluate hitters according to MLB.com.

Currently, Franklin Pierce Baseball’s top three OPS hitters in the batting lineup are John Friday with 0.946, Adam Chase with 0.943, and Dalton Davis with 0.894.

(Photo: Alison Palma)

According to Matt Janik, sabermetrics enthusiast and director of Athletic Communication, “Those are the guys (referring to the OPS hitters) right through the middle of the lineup who have been carrying the offensive load all season. Those numbers match with exactly who I would expect them to.”

Sabermetrics was created to allow for better decision making in the sport through objective evidence by evaluating players in each aspect of the game from batting to pitching and fielding. By calculating sabermetrics teams can make game decisions based on evidence rather than gut and instinct.

The formulas were completed based on the online statistics from the Franklin Pierce University Athletics website as of April 25th.

OPS measures a hitter’s offensive performance at the plate by taking into account their ability to get on base and hit for power. It considers the batting average and on-base and slugging ability of a player.

Essentially, the higher a hitter’s OPS, the greater chance they have of contributing to batting average, RBIs, homeruns, runs, and steals.

Despite the sabermetrics, it is difficult to tell if any current FPU players have major league potential. “There is a huge struggle to find how minor league stats transfer to the major league level, so it’s an even greater jump to compare college level to major league,” said Janik.

OPS is determined by combining a player’s on base percentage (OBP) with their slugging percentage (SLG). Each of those statistics has to be calculated individually and then added together to find OPS.

On base percentage is determined by adding a player’s hits + walks + hit by pitch and dividing it all by their total plate appearances. On base percentage measures how often a batter reaches base for any reason besides a fielding error, fielder’s choice, dropped/uncaught third strike, fielder’s obstruction or catcher’s interference.

Slugging percentage is a measure of the power of a player at the plate and is calculated by total bases divided by at bats. Each plate is given a greater value than its preceding one. For example, doubles are given greater value than singles, triples more than doubles, and homeruns the greatest value of all.

Once these statistics have each been calculated, the on base plus slugging sabermetric is found by adding each player’s individual OBP and SLG.

OBP Formula:

(Photo: Wikipedia)

Franklin Pierce Baseball players with highest on base percentage:

Player: OBP:
John Friday 0.432
Adam Chase 0.470
Dalton Davis 0.405
Lucas Luopa 0.392
Kyle Hood 0.387

SLG Formula:

(Photo: Wikipedia)

Franklin Pierce Baseball players with highest slugging percentage:

Player: SLG:
John Friday 0.514
Stephen Octave 0.490
Dalton Davis 0.489
Adam Chase 0.473
Dylan Jones 0.443

OPS Formula:

(Photo: Wikipedia)

Franklin Pierce Baseball players with highest OPS.

Player: OBP: SLG: OPS:
John Friday 0.432 0.514 0.946
Adam Chase 0.470 0.473 0.943
Dalton Davis 0.405 0.489 0.894
Stephen Octave 0.357 0.490 0.847
Lucas Luopa 0.392 0.439 0.831
Anthony DeDona 0.364 0.413 0.777

 

 

2 Responses to Sabermetrics tell us who FPU Baseball’s most valuable batters are

  1. Great ARticle! Keep up the good work.
    Mama P

    lori palma May 2, 2017 at 2:07 pm Reply
  2. Hello Kelsey, Thanks for the education on OPS. I think going forward players and fans alike will tend to use a rating system where the better players are listed in .900’s. I always marvel at the wonderful things said when someone only misses 60% of the time.

    I hope you keep writing… Jim Palma

    Jim Palma May 3, 2017 at 6:44 pm Reply

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