Salvia: The drug stronger than LSD you can legally smoke on campus

by Alex Thenin

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to encourage students to try salvia but to raise the issue to the administration.

(Photo: Alex Thenin)

Salvia is a hallucinogenic drug which is completely legal for purchase in NH if the person is above 18.

Salvia is considered stronger than LSD but only has a high of five minutes. The only reason it is not currently banned in NH is due to the fear that the law will impede with current salvia research. Salvia attaches its self to where opioids typically do, but somehow it doesn’t cause an addictive response. Researchers believe they can cure certain kinds of addiction to heroin and painkillers with this drug.

I went to a tobacco store and interviewed someone who sold salvia. She said it was a top seller and that people who took it only said good things about it. “Apparently someone left the current dimension and saw the world fall apart into another universe” she said. Asked about how to avoid the harmful effects of the drug, she stated that salvia got stronger after repeated use and that long term users should start using weaker strains to stop possible side effects.

There is no proof that doing the drug once will have any negative impact on an individual, although repeated use of the drug can lead to psychosis (detachment from reality), acid flashbacks and permanent brain damage. Castle Craig Hospital, a UK rehabilitation center has posted a warning which reeds “Combining salvia with other drugs may produce unexpected interactions with extremely dangerous effects.”

FPU’s drug policy does not cover salvia and since there are no rules banning it, it’s technically allowed on campus. One must remember though that the FPU drug policy does state that abuse of legal drugs can lead to penalties. Technically speaking since FPU only bans illegal drugs and alcohol use in public and NH has no law saying an individual can’t smoke in public, students can technically get high on salvia in the middle of campus.

After calling campus security twice and emailing them they still have not commented.

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